International Journal of Surgery Science
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International Journal of Surgery Science
Vol. 3, Issue 4, Part D (2019)

Clinical photography in surgery: Knowledge, attitudes and practices in Dakar

Author(s): Ndong A, Diallo AC, Faye M, Ndiaye M, Diouf A, Faye PM, Niasse A, Thiam JA, Sarr ISS, Seye Y, Gueye ML, Thiam O, Seck M, Touré AO, Cissé M, Ka O and Dieng M
Abstract: Background: Photography is very useful in medical practice, especially in surgery. Therefore, there are a growing number of legal issues related to the use of personal data. Our aim is to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices about the use of photography in surgery in Dakar.
Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study involving surgeons and surgical trainees using photography in their practice in Dakar. An auto administered questionnaire was sent. The studied parameters were: the type of image and the mode of storage, the frequency of use, the advantages and disadvantages according to the user, the attitudes towards the informed consent, the respect for anonymity.
Results: According to the type of pictures taken: 94.4% used it for clinical lesions; 90.3% for imaging images, 84.7% for per operative view. The type of device was a smartphone in 94.4%, a tablet in 4.2% and a digital camera in 1.4%. These images were stored on a smartphone in 77.8%, a personal computer in 76.4% and online in 19.4%. The benefits were noted in the follow-up of the patient (76.4%), in the communication between physicians (98.6%) and for a didactic purpose (79.2%). The main disadvantage was the alteration of the contact with the patient (9.2%). 30.6% say that it is not mandatory to have the patient's informed consent. 75% of those surveyed said they had faced at least once, a patient's refusal when they took pictures.
Conclusion: Medical photography is really interesting in daily medical practice, especially in surgery. These results suggest misconceptions about ethical principles (informed consent, anonymity of patient and hospital). Since personal data is sensitive, medical photography must be used with caution.
Pages: 220-222  |  30 Views  13 Downloads
How to cite this article:
Ndong A, Diallo AC, Faye M, Ndiaye M, Diouf A, Faye PM, Niasse A, Thiam JA, Sarr ISS, Seye Y, Gueye ML, Thiam O, Seck M, Touré AO, Cissé M, Ka O and Dieng M. Clinical photography in surgery: Knowledge, attitudes and practices in Dakar. International Journal of Surgery Science. 2019; 3(4): 220-222. DOI: https://doi.org/10.33545/surgery.2019.v3.i4d.244