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International Journal of Surgery Science
Vol. 3, Issue 4, Part I (2019)

Clinical profile of patients with chronic salivary gland swellings

Author(s): Dr. Thasin J Rasool
Abstract: Parotid gland is the largest of the salivary glands situated immediately inferior and anterior to the lower part of the ear. The gland weighs 14-18gms. The gland is purely serous in nature. It forms an irregular, lobulated, yellowish mass lying below the external acoustic meatus between the mandible and the sternomastoid muscle. It project forwards on to the surface of the masseter, where a small part of it, usually more or less detached, lies between the zygomatic arch above and the parotid duct below. This detached part is the accessory part of the parotid. The materials of the study was obtained from 129 patients who underwent fine needle aspiration of the salivary glands and the study confines itself to patients above the age of 12 years. The instruments for aspiration consisted of a 10 ml disposable syringe filled with a 22 G. or 23 G. needle. The skin at the site was wiped with an antiseptic and the suspected salivary gland swelling was held with one hand in a factorable position. No anaesthesia was used. In all the 22 cases correctly diagnosed as chronic sialadenitis, FNAC showed smears with benign acinar and ductal cells and the background showing sheets of lymphocytes, macrophages or neutrophils. In 2 case misinterpreted as pleomorphic adenoma, there were mono layered Sheets of ductal cells in a background of lymphocytes. In some areas, cells with squamoid appearance were seen. In the case misintrepted as warthins tumour showed amorphous and granular debris with sheets of lymphocytes. The smear showed sheets of oncocytic cells.
Pages: 521-524  |  907 Views  186 Downloads
How to cite this article:
Dr. Thasin J Rasool. Clinical profile of patients with chronic salivary gland swellings. Int J Surg Sci 2019;3(4):521-524. DOI: https://doi.org/10.33545/surgery.2019.v3.i4i.296
International Journal of Surgery Science